Tag Archives: preventative care

Is Our Current Insurance Model the Best Health Policy?

When the 48-year-old man from Oregon didn’t have insurance, he felt he had no place to go but the emergency room. The man, who has diabetes, went to the emergency room often when he suffered from kidney stones. “Emergency rooms, from what I understand, they can never turn you away,” he said. “I mean, you don’t have much options when you don’t have insurance.”

Then, when he enrolled in the state of Oregon’s Medicaid plan, that all changed. He started seeing doctors in their offices, and stayed away from the emergency room: “I have had five appointments with my primary, one with the diabetic because they had me go to a diabetic educator, and then an appointment with my pharmacist, and then he does a phone-in thing with me every two weeks.

His experience confirms common assumptions about how health care works. If we can just invest in preventive care, we can reduce the use of the emergency room and lower health care costs, the thinking goes. But it turns out that his experience wasn’t typical. He was part of a giant social policy experiment that randomly assigned some eligible people to get Medicaid and others to remain uninsured. Over all, the study found that people who got insurance actually used the emergency room more than their uninsured peers.

Collecting data that can trump a powerful anecdote is the value of the randomized controlled trial, says Amy Finkelstein, an M.I.T. professor and a leader of the Oregon study, which has published a series of papers, most recently on emergency room use.

That’s why this type of study — which randomly assigns some people to a new treatment and others to a placebo or an old approach — is the gold standard in evaluating the effectiveness of drugs: It can provide results that are both surprising and persuasive. But despite medical science’s long history with such studies, when it comes to the best way to design health care delivery, the randomized evaluation is still an incredibly rare approach.

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Jeffrey R. Ungvary President

Jeffrey R. Ungvary

Are Young Adults Heading to the Doctor?

I write about health and health care, but even I’m not immune to the “young and invincible” mentality. My annual dental checkup is more than six months overdue.

A provision of the Affordable Care Act that took effect in 2010 aimed to make it easier for young adults to access preventive care by allowing them to stay on their parents’ insurance until they turn 26. As of 2011, some 3 million young adults gained coverage through this provision.

So does this mean more young people are getting their annual checkups and cholesterol screenings?

Sort of, suggests a study published Monday in JAMA Pediatrics.

Researchers from the University of California, San Francisco found that after the provision took effect, the number of young adults using preventive care services went up slightly.

Between 2009 and 2011, there was a 3 percent increase in the number of young people getting routine checkups, and a 5 percent increase in annual dental visits.

But the 18- to 25-year-old group is still avoiding annual flu shots.

Though the improvement is modest, it is encouraging, says Dr. Josephine Lau, an assistant professor of pediatrics at UCSF who led the study. “This study shows us, basically, if we remove the financial barrier, young adults will actually take us up on getting the care that they need.”

The results are based on data from the annual Medical Expenditure Panel Survey, conducted by the Department of Health and Human Services. The researchers only looked at the numbers through 2011, before young adults had the option to get insurance through state and federal exchanges.

“As we start analyzing data from 2012, 2013 and 2014, we will likely see a further uptick in the number of young people getting preventive care,” Lau says.

To read more, click here.

Jeffrey R. Ungvary President

Jeffrey R. Ungvary